Restaurant or takeaway

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1. Catering

Energy used in catering could account for up to 4% and 6% of operating profits.*

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2. Refrigeration

Energy consumption of refrigeration equipment can be reduced by 2-4% if the set cooling temperature can be increased by 1°C.*

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3. Heating

A more efficient heating control can improve comfort conditions and save on costs.*

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4. Hot water

The optimum temperature for stored hot water is 60°C.*

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5. Lighting

Installing low-energy lighting can also reduce cooling costs.*

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5 ways to make your restaurant or takeaway more energy efficient

Restaurants and takeaways tend to renew and refurbish building stock on a regular basis. Most professional establishments refurbish every 7–10 years and this provides a significant opportunity for energy savings.

Some businesses could see energy costs reduce by as much as 40% if energy efficiency opportunities are maximised during refurbishment.

1. Catering open/close

Energy used in catering could account for up to 4% and 6% of operating profits. Saving energy could directly increase revenue and profitability without the need to increase sales.

Consider replacing any kitchen equipment over 15 years old with newer, more efficient models. When purchasing equipment, always consider the costs of the energy used over the lifetime of the product, not just the capital cost. Although gas-fired equipment can be more expensive to buy than electrical or steam equivalents, savings made on running costs make it an attractive option.

*Source:
Hospitality - Saving energy without compromising service, Carbon Trust
Food and drink processing - Introducing energy saving opportunities for business, Carbon Trust

2. Refrigeration open/close

Restaurants and takeaways are one of the largest users of refrigeration technology. They may find that refrigeration costs make up a significant proportion of their energy bill.

Refrigeration systems are at their most efficient when they are well maintained.

Blocked, dirty and leaking components can lead to increased energy demand, raising the costs for the business.

Areas to consider are:

  • Establish a programme of regular checks to ensure that equipment is in good working order and that any problems are pointed out to the maintenance contractor.
  • Identify scaling and ice-build up on evaporator fins.
  • Check evaporators and condensers for damaged vent fins, which make it more difficult to transfer heat.
  • Check that bleed/drip pipes are not iced up.

Keeping refrigerated produce at the correct temperature is better for food and it could make cost savings. Energy consumption of refrigeration equipment could be reduced by 2-4% if the set cooling temperature can be increased by 1°C. Ensure that the manufacturer's recommended operating temperature is set accordingly. See the table below for further guidelines.

Table 2 Correct temperatures for food products**

Temperature code Product temperature Suitable for
L1 Below -15°C/-18°C*** Ice cream and frozen foods
L2 Below -12°C/-18°C*** Frozen foods
M0 Between -1°C & +4°C Poultry and meat
M1 Between -1°C & +5°C Meat and dairy products
M2 Between -1°C & +7°C Processed meat and dairy products
H1 Between +1°C & +10°C Produce and canned and bottled drinks
H2 Between -1°C & +10°C Canned and bottled drinks

** The products in this table are only a guide. Refer to the Food Safety (Temperature Control) Regulations 1995 or your food supplier for more specific information relating to your food storage requirements.

*** The maximum temperatures shown are those allowed after defrost.

*Source:
Hospitality - Saving energy without compromising service, Carbon Trust
Food and drink processing - Introducing energy saving opportunities for business, Carbon Trust

3. Heating open/close

Create 'zones' in the building where separate time and temperature controls are installed. Zoned areas will provide closer, more efficient heating control which can improve comfort conditions and save on costs.

Restaurants could zone their building to take into account the different temperature requirements of the main restaurant, kitchen and storage areas.

Timers can be adjusted in restaurants so that buildings reach optimum temperature just as people arrive and begin to cool down as people leave. This can be achieved by gradually altering settings over a number of days and checking the response of the building and its occupants. If a building is occupied for different periods over the week, install seven-day timers to allow systems to operate only when the building is likely to be occupied.

Businesses with set working hours can benefit from the installation of a seven-day electronic time switch to permit different settings for each day. This will enable unnecessary usage to be cut dramatically and yield significant energy and cost savings.

*Source:
Hospitality - Saving energy without compromising service, Carbon Trust
Food and drink processing - Introducing energy saving opportunities for business, Carbon Trust

4. Hot water open/close

Save water – save energy: Wasting heated water is literally throwing money down the drain. Restaurants & takeaways could benefit from the installation of water conserving devices such as Tap controls – these switch taps off after a certain time and are useful in communal areas such as toilets.

Provision of hot water is essential for these businesses but it can lead to considerable energy costs. However, water is a metered and controllable resource and it is possible to save on both water and energy costs by implementing some inexpensive efficiency measures.

Set appropriate hot water temperatures: Excessive heating of hot water is wasteful and could scald staff or guests. The optimum temperature for stored hot water is 60°C which is adequate to kill Legionella bacteria and is sufficiently warm for staff and guests to use.

*Source:
Hospitality - Saving energy without compromising service, Carbon Trust
Food and drink processing - Introducing energy saving opportunities for business, Carbon Trust

5. Lighting open/close

Employees should be encouraged to report failing lamps and these should be replaced immediately. This will help maintain the desired light output and in turn, provide a safer, more attractive environment for both staff and customers.

When checking lights also ensure that timers are set to match trading hours and that occupancy sensors are clean.

Remember: Tungsten halogen lighting is not particularly efficient and so should be used sparingly. A lighting designer may be able to assist in creating a more efficient lighting scheme that saves money in the long run.

Many businesses can achieve savings by using light-emitting diode (LED) or luminescent exit signs that have approximate paybacks of less than two years.

Large, clean windows in restaurants can help entice passing trade, but make sure they are properly glazed to minimise heat loss. Guests already inside the building will benefit from maximum use of natural daylight and enhanced views.

Lighting equipment is also a major heat emitter in a building. As a general rule, the more energy efficient equipment is, the less heat it produces. So installing low-energy lighting can also reduce cooling costs – a double saving.

*Source:
Hospitality - Saving energy without compromising service, Carbon Trust
Food and drink processing - Introducing energy saving opportunities for business, Carbon Trust