Pub

Select an item to find out more

 

1. Heating

Heating should only be on if the temperature drops below the recommended minimum.*

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2. Lighting

Without regular maintenance, light levels can fall by up to 30% in 2-3 years.*

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3. Cellar services

Overcooling the cellar by 1°C can add up to 10% to cellar energy costs.*

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4. Hot water

The optimum temperature for stored hot water is 60°C.*

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5. Other

Around two thirds of heat from a typical building is lost through the building fabric.*

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5 ways to make your pub more energy efficient

Many businesses such as pubs renew and refurbish building stock on a regular basis. Many establishments refurbish every 7–10 years and this provides a significant opportunity for energy savings.

Some businesses have seen energy costs reduce by as much as 40% if energy efficiency opportunities are maximised during refurbishment. The majority of energy use within the average pub is within heating and lighting.

1. Heating open/close

Zoning to match building occupancy can reduce operating costs. Pubs could zone the main lounge areas and function rooms separately.

Businesses with set working hours can benefit from the installation of a seven-day electronic time switch to permit different settings for each day. This will enable unnecessary usage to be cut dramatically and yield significant energy and cost savings. Timers can be adjusted in pubs so that buildings reach optimum temperature just as people arrive and begin to cool down as people leave. This can be achieved by gradually altering settings over a number of days and checking the response of the building and its occupants. Recommended temperatures for specific areas room types such as bars and lounges 20-22°C.

The location of thermostats is very important. Check they are not influenced by draughts, sunlight or internal heat sources like radiators or fireplaces. Discourage staff from using thermostats as on/off switches – turning to maximum does not speed up the heating process; the space simply overheats, making customers uncomfortable.

Thermostats should be regularly checked to ensure that they are working correctly. Some businesses use separate room thermometers to double check that thermostats are turning the heating on when required. Heating should only be on if the temperature drops below the recommended minimum. If heating is on above these temperatures, check thermostats and adjust accordingly. If they are already set correctly and the heating is still on, ask a qualified heating technician to check or replace them.

*Source:
Hospitality - Saving energy without compromising service, Carbon Trust
Food and drink processing - Introducing energy saving opportunities for business, Carbon Trust

2. Lighting open/close

Lighting is essential for providing a pleasant guest experience so it is important to keep windows, skylights and light fittings clean. Without regular maintenance, light levels can fall by up to 30% in 2-3 years.

Lighting is a fundamental element of any pub business and its expense has always been accepted as inevitable. Yet by implementing lighting controls and efficient luminaires (LED's), lighting energy costs can sometimes be reduced by up to 50%.

Effective and attractive lighting is essential for customer comfort and satisfaction as well as for the health and safety of staff and visitors.

Judicious use of energy efficient lighting and controls can enhance all aspects of operation in providing:

  • General lighting to communal areas such as receptions and corridors.
  • Theme or mood lighting
  • Security and safety lighting.
  • External lighting for car parks and signage.

Tungsten halogen spot lighting is commonly found in pubs and is used to provide 'sparkle' to lighting arrangements. If these lights are on a low voltage circuit then savings can be achieved by using 35W bulbs with an infra-red reflective coating (IRC) instead of the standard 50W bulbs.

*Source:
Hospitality - Saving energy without compromising service, Carbon Trust
Food and drink processing - Introducing energy saving opportunities for business, Carbon Trust

3. Cellar services open/close

The energy used for cooling beverages in a typical pub is in excess of 10% of the total energy cost, and approximately half of this goes into cellar cooling. Savings of 10-50% can be achieved by following five main principles for reducing energy use in cellars:

  1. Improve layout – Locate any heat-producing equipment, such as line coolers for beer and soft drinks, cooling cabinets and icemakers outside the cellar in a well-ventilated service area.
  2. Install thermal insulation and draught stripping – Heating pipes should ideally not pass through cellars. Where this is unavoidable, pipes, fittings, flanges and valves should be insulated and draught stripping applied in any places where pipes pass through walls. Cellar doors and hatches should also be draught-stripped and insulated. Access doors should be self-closing and shut immediately after deliveries.
  3. Replace lighting – 'Standard' tungsten bulbs should be replaced immediately with compact fluorescent bulbs (CFLs) or fluorescent strip lighting. Lighting should be turned off whenever possible to avoid excess heat production.
  4. Check refrigeration equipment – Ensure pipe work circuits are kept as short as possible and that the condenser unit is sited in a well-ventilated location. Locate cooling system temperature sensors where they can provide a reliable indication of the cellar temperature – ideally at the opposite end of the cellar from the evaporator and at the top of barrel height. Set the control to the recommended cellar temperature (usually between 11-13°C) and check regularly with a separate thermometer to ensure that the sensor is operating reliably. Overcooling the cellar by 1°C can add up to 10% to cellar energy costs.
  5. Maintain regularly for optimum performance – Ensure equipment is properly maintained so that it operates efficiently. Maintenance costs should always be considered when purchasing new apparatus. Evaporators and heat rejection coils require regular cleaning to allow free airflow and economic operation. Condenser trays should be emptied to avoid water fouling the coil.

*Source:
Hospitality - Saving energy without compromising service, Carbon Trust
Food and drink processing - Introducing energy saving opportunities for business, Carbon Trust

4. Hot water open/close

Set appropriate hot water temperatures - Excessive heating of hot water is wasteful and could scald staff or guests. The optimum temperature for stored hot water is 60°C which is adequate to kill Legionella bacteria and is sufficiently warm for staff and guests to use.

Businesses such as pubs with set working hours can benefit from the installation of a seven-day electronic time switch to permit different settings for each day. This will enable unnecessary usage to be cut dramatically and yield significant energy and cost savings.

Wasting heated water is literally throwing money down the drain. All businesses could benefit from the installation of water conserving devices such as urinal flush controls – these help to reduce unnecessary flushing in toilets.

Before investing in these technologies, a trial is recommended to ensure that savings are achievable whilst maintaining the customer experience.

*Source:
Hospitality - Saving energy without compromising service, Carbon Trust
Food and drink processing - Introducing energy saving opportunities for business, Carbon Trust

5. Other open/close

Building

Around two thirds of heat from a typical building is lost through the building fabric (walls, floors and ceilings). It therefore makes good sense to make improvements in this area during a major refurbishment project, and/or prior to replacing or upgrading any existing heating system.

A well designed refurbishment project, whatever the size or nature, will provide an ideal opportunity to integrate energy efficiency into the fabric of the building. There are many technologies available which can help gain the greatest benefits and most efficient use of the energy required to run a hospitality establishment.

Catering and appliances

Sub-meters will help identify cost savings and justify any investments required in order to lower running costs. If catering is provided by a separate company, there is also the additional benefit of allowing for budget allocation and charging to take place. This could act as an incentive for kitchen managers to reduce energy costs by providing some financial reward for doing so.

*Source:
Hospitality - Saving energy without compromising service, Carbon Trust
Food and drink processing - Introducing energy saving opportunities for business, Carbon Trust