Hotel or B&B

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1. Heating

This can account for more than 40% of energy use.*

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2. Hot water

The optimum temperature for stored hot water is 60°C.*

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3. Catering

Raising awareness amongst kitchen staff could reduce catering energy use by up to 30%.*

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4. Lighting

Compact Fluorescent Lamps (CFL) use 75% less energy and LEDs, use up to 80%.*

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5. Air conditioning

Regular cleaning of ventilation systems can increase efficiency by as much as 25%.*

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5 ways to make your hotel or bed & breakfast more energy efficient

Controlling energy use can often make conditions more comfortable for guests and customers - and comfortable customers will be encouraged to return. Some customers may be more inclined to choose a hotel that does not damage the environment and some are even prepared to pay a premium to ensure this.

1. Heating open/close

Heating can account for more than 40% of energy use in non-domestic buildings which means that there are big opportunities to make savings. A good starting point is to know the recommended temperatures for specific areas in your business and use that as a guide; such as, guest bathrooms 26-27°C.

Avoid overheating guest bedrooms as this can cause discomfort and affect the quality of guests' rest and relaxation. 19-21°C is a good temperature for a comfortable night's sleep so ensure your controls are set accordingly.

Have boilers serviced regularly by a reputable firm. A regularly serviced boiler could potentially save 5% on annual heating costs, and ensure the continued smooth operation of the boiler and heating system.

Some areas in larger buildings such as hotels require different levels of heating. Zoned areas will provide closer, more efficient heating control which can improve comfort conditions and save on costs. Hotels with zoned areas could turn heating down or even off on unoccupied floors.

*Source:
Hospitality - Saving energy without compromising service, Carbon Trust.
Food and drink processing - Introducing energy saving opportunities for business, Carbon Trust.

2. Hot water open/close

Provision of hot water is essential but it can lead to considerable energy costs. However, water is a metered and controllable resource and it is possible to save on both water and energy costs by implementing some inexpensive efficiency measures.

Set appropriate hot water temperatures - Excessive heating of hot water is wasteful and could scald staff or guests. The optimum temperature for stored hot water is 60°C which is adequate to kill Legionella bacteria and is sufficiently warm for staff and guests to use.

Urinal flush controls – these help to reduce unnecessary flushing in toilets.

Myth: Energy conservation in hotels can undermine quality, reduce guest comfort and deter customers from returning.

Reality: Properly implemented energy management programmes often improve guest comfort, for example, by ensuring that room and water temperatures are appropriate.

*Source:
Hospitality - Saving energy without compromising service, Carbon Trust.
Food and drink processing - Introducing energy saving opportunities for business, Carbon Trust.

3. Catering open/close

Simple actions such as raising awareness amongst kitchen staff and providing energy management training could reduce catering energy use by up to 30%.

Switch off, or at least turn down equipment when it is not required. Catering equipment generates heat and as well as wasting energy, it will make the kitchen less comfortable to work in if left on.

Switch off grills, fryers and hobs immediately after use, along with lights and extraction fans when they are not being used.

Similarly, switching on at the right time can make a big difference. Most modern catering equipment reaches optimum temperature quickly. Label equipment with its preheat time and educate staff to switch on only when required.

Using the kitchen equipment properly also makes a difference; choosing the correct saucepan size for the job and using lids where possible. Using a frying pan rather than a griddle for one customer and keeping chillers and freezer door openings to a minimum.

Using dishwashers at full loads, including those used for glasses. Shortening the drying times in dishwasher cycles and using the residual heat in the dishwasher to dry the contents instead of using expensive power drying cycles.

Purchase equipment with running costs in mind. Consider replacing any kitchen equipment over 15 years old with newer, more efficient models.

Refrigeration maintenance schedules are important too. Ensure that defrost procedures are followed. Defrosting should be carried out every two months as a minimum, or following manufacturers' recommendations. This saves energy and prolongs the lifetime of equipment.

Check door seals on cold rooms, fridges and frozen food stores and replace if damaged. Keep condensers and evaporator coils clean and free of dust and check systems have the correct amount of refrigerant.

*Source:
Hospitality - Saving energy without compromising service, Carbon Trust.
Food and drink processing - Introducing energy saving opportunities for business, Carbon Trust.

4. Lighting open/close

Modern low-energy bulbs are attractive and provide very good light output. Upgrade any standard light bulbs to compact fluorescent lamps (CFL) which use up to 75% less energy, produce less unwanted heat and last 8-10 times longer, or LEDs, which use up to 80% less energy and provide around 50,000 hours of use.

Consider occupancy linked controls; a range of modern controls exist to switch energy consuming services down or off when a guest vacates a room.

Some systems can be controlled from the front desk, enabling activation of lighting, heating and ventilation when guests arrive.

Other systems are based on key-card access or occupancy sensors that manage services based on room occupancy. Many of these systems achieve significant savings and could pay back their installation costs within 1-3 years.

*Source:
Hospitality - Saving energy without compromising service, Carbon Trust.
Food and drink processing - Introducing energy saving opportunities for business, Carbon Trust.

5. Air conditioning open/close

The provision of fresh air at a comfortable temperature is critical to guest comfort and satisfaction.

As well as creating a comfortable atmosphere, supplying regular volumes of fresh, uncontaminated air is a legal requirement under some building and health and safety regulations. In specific areas of a building, such as kitchens, adequate ventilation is essential to deal with the unpleasant side effects of odours and smoke inhalation. For further information, visit the Health and Safety Executive or the Department for Communities and Local Government.

Regular cleaning of ventilation systems can increase efficiency by as much as 25% compared with un-maintained systems. Dirty or faulty fans, air ducts and components directly affect system efficiency and will increase running costs and risk of breakdown. The performance of the whole system should be reviewed annually and replacement parts ordered as necessary. Always consult a maintenance technician.

Do not let heating and cooling operate at the same time. This is a common problem in hotels and can be avoided by setting a temperature 'dead band' – a wide gap between the temperatures at which heating and cooling cut in. For example, heating in a hotel might switch off when a temperature of 19°C has been reached and cooling would not come on until the temperature exceeds 24°C.

*Source:
Hospitality - Saving energy without compromising service, Carbon Trust.
Food and drink processing - Introducing energy saving opportunities for business, Carbon Trust.